Shakespeare and Scott.
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Shakespeare and Scott.

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Published in [N.p.] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Shakespeare, William, -- 1564-1616,
  • Scott, Walter, -- Sir, -- 1771-1832.

Book details:

Classifications
LC ClassificationsPR2925 S53
The Physical Object
Pagination[various pagings]
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17468055M

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David Scott Kastan is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. He is a specialist on Shakespeare and early modern culture. His most recent book is Shakespeare After Theory () and his other publications include Shakespeare and the Shapes of Time (), Staging the Renaissance (, edited with Peter Price: $   " hundreds of examples of historical and literary consilience have been compiled by Purchase College theatre professor and playwright Scott McCrea in his aptly titled book The Case for Shakespeare (Praeger, ), which demonstrates beyond a reasonable doubt that, in the Bard's own words from Julius Caesar, Shakespeare was not just a man Author: Scott Mccrea.   This book is a authoritative account of Shakespeare's plays as they were transformed from scripts to be performed into books to be read, and eventually from popular entertainment into the. In fourteen brief, lively chapters that draw from Shakespeare’s world and works, and from other writers past and present, Scott Newstok distills vital habits of mind that can help you think more deeply, write more effectively, and learn more joyfully, in school or beyond.

David Scott Kastan is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. Among his publications are Shakespeare and the Shapes of Time, Staging the Renaissance (ed. with Peter Stallybrass), Critical Essays on Shakespeare's Hamlet, and The New History of Early English Drama (ed. with John Cox).Cited by:   Kastan examines the material forms in which we encounter Shakespeare including the exhilarating possibilities of electronic media for presenting Shakespeare now to new generations of readers. This is an important contribution to Shakespearean textual scholarship, to the history of the early English book trade, and to the theory of drama by: Something Rotten! is an original musical comedy with a book by John O'Farrell and Karey Kirkpatrick and music and lyrics by Karey and Wayne in , the story follows the Bottom brothers, Nick and Nigel, who struggle to find success in the theatrical world, as they compete with the wild popularity of their contemporary William Shakespeare. ”—Scott Newstok, author of How to Think Like Shakespeare: Lessons from a Renaissance Education “ As Wilson illustrates, the political drama that has unfolded since is tragedy, comedy, and history rolled into one—and the consequence, in part, of a failure in the humanities to instill the moral and civic lessons that bind s: 4.

This book is a authoritative account of Shakespeare's plays as they were transformed from scripts to be performed into books to be read, and eventually from popular entertainment into the centerpieces of the English literary canon/5. A wonderfully light-footed and erudite investigation of education (and so much more), by means of Shakespeare (and so much more). Scott Newstok’s book, a playful delight, also delivers a serious pedagogical punch. — Sarah Bakewell, author of How to Live: Or a Life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty Attempts at an Answer. What makes Newstok’s book stand out from other texts promoting a back-to-basics approach is the lively writing and the playful intertextuality of the prose. Every page of this book brings together a patchwork of quotes from both classical and contemporary sources, from Shakespeare (naturally) to . 19 hours ago  How to Think Like Shakespeare by Scott Newstok is a compelling read for Shakespeare lovers, educators, and those interested in improving their personal critical thinking skills. The concept behind the book is an examination of how Elizabethan grammar schools taught their students to think and create in ways that would still be useful to us today.